Menu
Log in

The Manor Conservancy

  DONATE

<< First  < Prev   1   2   3   4   5   ...   Next >  Last >> 
  • 10/11/2023 1:27 PM | Timbrooke Filbert (Administrator)

    Some 70 people attended the Annual Members Meeting of The Manor Conservancy held on November 2nd at St. James, Monkton Church Hall.  Ron Maher, Thorne Gould, Susanna Brellis, Patrick Smith, Joan Norman, and Doug Behrens were re-elected to the Board. The evening's speaker was Dan Coates, president of the Archeological Society of the Northern Chesapeake.  Dan gave a well received presentation on the natural resource features of the Manor region and their influence on the early (pre-contact) people of the area. Ron Maher, Jr. was presented with the Sergeant Murphy Award for Land Conservation. The award is given only periodically to an individual who has shown extraordinary service to the Conservancy and its mission.  Ron was recognized for thirty years of service as a board member, officer, and Chair of the Conservancy's three major annual fundraising events. Pictured below with Ron are his wife Peggy,  their son Jack and TMC President, Henry Pitts.

  • 18/10/2023 3:18 PM | Timbrooke Filbert (Administrator)

    The Manor Conservancy hosted its 2023 Annual Sporting Clays Shoot on Oct. 8, at First Mine Run in White Hall. 45 participants took part in the shoot with many non-shooters coming out to support the cause.  The bad weather that arrived on the originally scheduled date had forced postponement of the event.  We are appreciate all those who rearranged their schedules to come out on the substitute date.    The event raised $4500 to further the Conservancy's work.  A special "thank you" to the club and manager David Pitts for once again hosting the event.

  • 26/06/2023 3:03 PM | Timbrooke Filbert (Administrator)

    Our 2023 benefit trail ride raised over $2000 for the Conservancy's Iglehart Fund.  Many thanks to the landowners who kindly allowed us to traverse their properties.

  • 26/06/2023 2:58 PM | Timbrooke Filbert (Administrator)

    Presented in New York City on June 1st, 2023 

  • 18/06/2021 12:30 PM | Anonymous

    We always celebrate when a property is preserved, but this 58-acre farm in White Hall is extra special. Several years ago the owner was ready to allow a ground-mounted commercial solar installation to be erected. We were thrilled when he changed his mind and determined that the farm should remain a farm forever. Crops will continue to be grown, an amazing viewshed will remain intact, and more than 400 feet of stream will protected as well. Thanks to our partners at Rural Legacy/ Maryland Department of Natural Resources for their help and support.

           


  • 29/03/2021 1:34 PM | Anonymous

    On March 23, local birder Marty Brazeau presented a lecture on birds that can be found at different levels of local forests. A recording is available on YouTube at https://youtu.be/WctLAkL4K4s.


  • 11/03/2021 11:25 AM | Anonymous

    In Casablanca, one of the greatest movies of all time, a pickpocket warns a man to be careful of the "vultures" surrounding him, even as he stole the man's wallet. But an article in Momentum, the magazine put out by the College of Agriculture & Natural Resources at The University of Maryland, describes how valuable vultures are to the environment and to human health. Read more about vulture conservation and you'll never look at them the same way.

  • 26/02/2021 2:20 PM | Anonymous

    The Baltimore County Executive is holding virtual Town Hall Meetings for each councilmanic district. These Town Hall Meetings present an opportunity for residents to weigh in on budget priorities. 

    The schedule is as follows, along with how to join by phone:

    6TH DISTRICT TOWN HALL WITH COUNCILWOMAN CATHY BEVINS

    Tuesday, March 2 at 6:30 p.m.

    Call-in: 1-415-655-0001; Access code: 180 025 4055

    2ND DISTRICT TOWN HALL WITH COUNCILMAN IZZY PATOKA

    Monday, March 8 at 6:30 p.m.

    Call-in: 1-415-655-0001; Access code: 180 686 0349

    1ST DISTRICT TOWN HALL WITH COUNCILMAN TOM QUIRK

    Thursday, March 11 at 6:30 p.m.

    Call-in: 1-415-655-0001; Access code: 180 385 0425

    7TH DISTRICT TOWN HALL WITH COUNCILMAN TODD CRANDELL

    Tuesday, March 16 at 6 p.m.

    Call-in: 1-415-655-0001; Access code: 180 815 9310

    3RD DISTRICT TOWN HALL WITH COUNCILMAN WADE KACH

    Thursday, March 18 at 6:30 p.m.

    Call-in: 1-415-655-0001; Access code: 180 202 5808

    To submit comments and ideas in advance, go to townhall@baltimorecountymd.gov. 

    To view live, visit Baltimore County's YouTube page at https://www.youtube.com/user/BaltimoreCounty.


  • 08/02/2021 11:25 AM | Anonymous

    American history is Black history. So much of American history is more diverse than it might appear, including the history of land conservation.

    In 1866, the year after the Civil War ended, Congress established regiments of enlisted Black soldiers. The 24th and 25th Infantry and the 9th and 10th Cavalry served in peacetime as well as in every American war until the US Army integrated troops in 1951. These Black soldiers were known as Buffalo Soldiers, the name given them by Native Americans, possibly as a respectful reflection of an animal they esteemed for its bravery and fierceness.

    Until 1913, when the Park Service was established, the military was the sole protector of national parks, and the Buffalo Soldiers could be considered among the first park rangers. In Sequoia and Yosemite National Parks, they chased away poachers, fought fires, and constructed trails in the late 1800s and early 1900s. They endured long days in the saddle, racism, and slim rations, as well as separation from family.

    Their legacy includes an arboretum in Yosemite that is considered to be the first museum in the National Park System, as well as the first trail to the top of Mount Whitney, at that time the highest peak in the United States.

    Another legacy of the Buffalo Soldiers may be the Ranger hat, also known as the Smokey Bear hat. Although not officially adopted by the Army until 1911, the distinctive hat crease, called a Montana peak or pinch, is worn by several of the Buffalo Soldiers in park photographs dating back to 1899. Soldiers serving in the Spanish–American War added the pinch to Stetsons to better shed water from tropical rains. The park photographs show Buffalo Soldiers who were probably veterans of that 1898 war.

    We owe a debt of gratitude to these unsung conservation heroes.


<< First  < Prev   1   2   3   4   5   ...   Next >  Last >> 

Click here for newsletter archive.

 Â©Copyright 2022 The Manor Conservancy. All Rights Reserved. Membership Association Websites by SPARKS!
Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software